Recent Blog Entries

  • 19 hours ago
    Posted by Dion Todd
    Isaac entreated Yahweh for his wife, because she was barren. Yahweh was entreated by him, and Rebekah his wife conceived. Genesis 25:21 WEBRebekah was barren and could not have children, but when her husband Isaac prayed for her, she became pregnant with twins. If you read the details, Isaac was for...
  • Thu at 3:01 AM
    Posted by Dion Todd
    Very early in the morning, while it was still dark, Jesus got up, left the house and went off to a solitary place, where He prayed. Mark 1:34 NIVIt was early in the morning as I walked into my little prayer room. After praying for a few minutes I sat in the quiet solitude, mostly wondering how we we...
  • Wed at 3:01 AM
    Posted by Dion Todd
    Then he began to denounce the cities in which most of his mighty works had been done, because they didn't repent. 'Woe to you, Chorazin! Woe to you, Bethsaida! For if the mighty works had been done in Tyre and Sidon which were done in you, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes. Bu...
View All




Luke Chapter 19

  • Bible Study on Luke 

    Luke Chapter 19


    >> Click Here For Audio Version << 
     

    Luke 19 Outline:

    19:01-10 Zacchaeus.
    19:11-27 The parable of the ten minas.
    19:28-40 The approach to Jerusalem in triumph.
    19:41-44 The lament over Jerusalem.
    19:45-46 The cleansing of the temple.
    19:47-48 Teaching in the temple.

    Fun Facts:
    — The mina coin (pound) was worth about one hundred days wages for common labor like fruit picking.
    — Jesus may have cleansed the temple twice. John records one at the beginning of His ministry, and Luke one at the end.


    Study Notes:
    Luke 19:01-10 The story of Zacchaeus and the term “chief tax collector” are only mentioned in Luke. He was a chief tax collector, and very rich. The Roman occupiers imposed taxes on the Jewish people. The tax collectors then collected the money, kept a portion for themselves, and passed on what was required to Rome.

    Tax collectors were usually Jewish people who preyed upon their own people. They were especially hated, considered traitors, and socially classed below prostitutes and sinners. They had a special social class of their own and you see the phrase many times in the New Testament, “Tax collectors and sinners.” Zacchaeus was a chief tax collector, meaning that he oversaw others.

    The road was crowded with people as Jesus came to the town and the crowd would not have given way for a tax collector like Zacchaeus. They would have ignored him or told him “You have no part in this, sinner.” Zacchaeus was short and could not see over the crowd, but he wanted to see Jesus so badly that he climbed up in a tree just to get a look at him as He passed by.

    Jesus stopped underneath the tree, looked up and said “Zacchaeus, hurry and come down, for today I must stay at your house.” Jesus called Zacchaeus by name and said I “must” stay at your house. The whole crowd murmured and complained that Jesus went to eat with a sinner.

    Zacchaeus immediately had a complete change of heart when visited by the Lord and gave half his goods to the poor, and made a vow to restore four times what he had wrongfully taken. Thieves that stole animals were required to restore four-fold (2Sam. 12:6). Zacchaeus made a complete turn around in his life.

    Jesus said that He had come to seek and to save the lord, and here He had done exactly that. Zacchaeus was lost, but after he was visited by Jesus, he was saved. The humble nature of Zacchaeus is a stark contrast to the rich young ruler.

    Hunger draws the Lord. Jesus will pass by ten-thousand people to get to one that truly desires His presence. Often these are some of the lowest in the social order. Jesus has friends in low places.

    Luke 19:11-27 Jesus told a parable about a nobleman that called ten servants and gave each one a mina coin. This parable resembles the parable of the talents in Matthew 25, but they are different parables entirely. Jesus sometimes used the same type of story, in a different way to bring out a different meaning.

    In the parable of the talents in Matthew, the man gave the servants varying, but large sums according to their ability. Here the man gave ten servants the same amount. The servants here are being tested to see if they are fit for larger tasks. The parable in Matthew reminds us that we all have different gifts, while this one in Luke shows that we all have one basic task while here, living out our faith.

    The mina coin (pound) was worth about one hundred days wages for common labor like fruit picking. When the nobleman returned, he called his servants to give their accounts. The first had increased by 1,000%. The second increased by 500%. They were both humble servants as well and took no credit, but only said “Your mina has gained…” Both of them are promoted and given cities to rule over according to their increase.

    The third man was called and had done nothing with his mina, but hid it away in a napkin. He said that he was afraid (21). He described his master as a severe man who expected to get blood out of a stone. The servant could have at least put the money in the bank on interest. There were no banks then but interestingly enough, the word bank is derived from bench, the money-lenders bench. Instead the frightened servant did nothing. The money was taken from the frightened servant and given to the man that had proved that he could make good use of it.

    The other seven servants, we are left to wonder about. There were only two classes of servants though: Those that made good use of what they had, and those who did not. Those who can be trusted with a little, can be trusted with much (Luke 16:10). Fear was a major factor in making the third servant ineffective.

    To me the parable is about Jesus who has traveled far away to receive His Kingdom. One day He will return. We are the servants that He has left here and are to be about His business until He comes back. Fear will stop us if we allow it. In the Christian, life we do not stand still. We use our gifts and make progress or we lose what we even have. If I stop reading the Bible for a year, I tend to forget what I already once knew.

    The parable has a scary ending. After the master settles accounts with his faithful servants, he calls the enemies that did not want him to be their king, and has them killed before him. God is long suffering, loving, compassionate and patient, but today is the day of salvation (2Cor. 6:1). When Jesus returns, it will be too late to repent. Those that have rejected Him their whole lives will be considered enemies and forever lost. It is not His choice, it is entirely ours and it is a matter of life and death.

    Luke 19:28-40 The chief priests and Pharisees had in a way put a bounty out for Jesus, and wanted anyone that knew where He was to tell them so that they could arrest Him (John 11:57). Jesus, instead of hiding in fear, rides straight into Jerusalem in broad daylight with an entourage. Jesus was so popular with the people that it overrode the hostility of the religious haters. When they did come for Him, it was at night.

    Bethany was a village about two miles from Jerusalem, on the east side of the mount of olives. As Jesus got close, He sent two of His disciples ahead to fetch a donkey. They went and found it exactly where He had said, and when the owners asked what they were doing, they told them, “The Lord needs it” and they let them leave with it. This was either a pre-arranged password with disciples that would know Jesus as “The Lord” or it was a word of knowledge, but they brought the donkey.

    The disciples placed their cloaks on the donkey and set Jesus on it. The procession began their entry into Jerusalem and they made a carpet out of their cloaks before Him. John tells us that they also used palm branches. It was a very happy scene and the disciples began to rejoice and praise God and said “Blessed is the King who comes in the name of the Lord!” All four gospels mention this statement.

    Zechariah 9:9 records that the Messiah would come to Jerusalem riding on the colt of a donkey. The donkey was the mount of a man of peace, merchants or priests. A king would usually show up on a mighty warhorse. The King of Kings rode into town on an humble donkey. The Pharisees tell Jesus to calm the crowd down, but He told them that if they were silent, the stones would cry out. This was a pinnacle in the history of the world.

    Luke 19:41-44 Jesus stopped and wept over the city of Jerusalem. Though this day was prophesied in many places in the scriptures they cherished, they did not recognize Jesus as the Messiah. They did not know the time of His visitation. The day soon came when every word that Jesus spoke over the city was fulfilled and Jerusalem was destroyed.

    Around thirty years later in 66 AD, the Roman procurator (treasury officer) was Gessius Florus, who happened to love money and hated Jews. When the tax revenues became low, he seized silver from the temple in Jerusalem. When the Jews started an uproar, he sent troops into Jerusalem and massacred 3,600 citizens. That started a rebellion that grew into a full blown war, the First Jewish Revolt.

    The revolt began (and ended later) at Masada and spread all through the region. Jerusalem killed or expelled all the Roman soldiers there, and then Galilee. Cestius Cailus who was the Roman governor, sent 20,000 Roman soldiers and besieged Jerusalem for six months, but he lost 6,000 men and withdrew.

    Then Roman Emperor Nero sent a decorated general named Vespasian to recapture the area, but as he neared Jerusalem, Nero died and Vespasian had to return home. He soon became the next Emperor, and he appointed his son Titus to fight the Jewish war in his place.

    Forward to 69-70 a.d. Titus was now a general and the Romans had dug a trench completely around the walls of Jerusalem which were nearly five miles in length. They did this to lock the inhabitants in and starve them into surrender. The Romans fought hard to take the city, and the Jews very stubbornly resisted.

    The Romans used catapults to pound the walls with boulders and battering rams against the fortifications. The defenders fought all day and struggled to rebuild the walls at night.

    As the war waged on, the people began starving to death and dying from plagues. Eventually the Romans overcame the defenses, broke through the outer wall, the second wall, and finally the third wall. The remaining defenders locked themselves in the temple as their last line of defense.

    When the walls were breached, Titus marched in with 30,000 Roman soldiers and began a systematic slaughter of all the inhabitants of Jerusalem. It is estimated that they killed 600,000 people including many visitors who had become trapped there because the siege began during the passover.

    Titus had wanted to preserve the temple, but the soldiers were so angry at the Jews that they burned it, and the city to the ground. The fires raged on for a month and were so hot that it caused the gold that lined the temple walls to melt and run down between the cracks in the stones.

    The Romans then pulled down every single stone and used a plow to rake the dirt in the temple area so they could get at the melted gold. The siege of Jerusalem had lasted 143 days. By 73 a.d. All traces of a Jewish nation were completely gone. That marked the end of a Jewish state until modern times. On May 14th 1948, Israel became a nation again.

    “Jesus went out from the temple, and was going on his way. His disciples came to him to show him the buildings of the temple. But he answered them, “Don’t you see all of these things? Most assuredly I tell you, there will not be left here one stone on another, that will not be thrown down” (Matthew 24:1–2).

    He was so right…

    Luke 19:45-46 Mark tells us that the cleansing of the temple happened the following day (Mark 11:11). Jesus entered into the temple at Jerusalem and began to drive out those buying and selling there as well as the money changers. He said it is written, "My house is a house of prayer, but you have made it a den of robbers!"

    Luke 19:47-48 Jesus began to teach daily in the temple, but now the chief priests, the scribes and the leading men of the people sought to destroy Him. Still, the people were too close to Jesus and eagerly listened to Him. The man they wanted to kill so bad, sat teaching right in front of them, yet they could not do anything about it. The friction is building.

    Study Questions: (if your answers are very long, you may want to type them first in something like Notepad, which doesn't require an Internet connection, then copy and paste (Ctrl-A to select, Ctrl-C to copy, Ctrl-V to paste), to prevent mishaps. Also, there is a 3K character limit, so if they are super long, feel free to post more than once, and just answer a couple of questions at a time. You are welcome to post any questions you may have, as well. We look forward to your thoughts!)

    1) In Luke 19:1-9, what was it about Zacchaeus that caused Jesus to single him about amongst all others?

    2) In the Parable of the Ten Minas, why was the nobleman so angry with the servant who did nothing with the money he was given?

    3) For what reason were the Pharisees telling Jesus to rebuke His disciples in Luke 19:39?

    4) Why was Jesus so angry at those in the temple in Luke 19:45?


Tip: You must be logged into the website to leave comments.

 

Social Sharing

24 comments
  • 1
Kathy Banfield
Kathy Banfield #1 Jesus knew Zacchaeus would humble himself, repent, and make complete amends for his sinful behavior. Jesus knows our hearts!#2 Because the feaful servant could have placed the money in a bank to earn interest--instead, he let his fear paralize him and did nothing! Fear will paralize us if we don't have faith in God.I'd venture to say the fearful servant had little faith in the Lord, and relied on what he himself believed to be thr truth.It sounds like he was a "lukearm" Chriatain at best!#3 The Pharisees felt threatened by Jesus and did not want Him to stir up the crowd.All the while Jesus walked on earth, few acknowleged that He was the Savior! Plus, they intended to kill Jesus.How would it look if they murdered God's Son? So, they tried to quench the excitement of those who DID believe.#4 Jesus was infuriated because, once again, His Father's house was being used for buying, selling and home of money changers. I find it interesting that all throughout the Gospels, jesus displayed great restraint in dealing with difficult people. But when it came to God's house, He was not hesitant to show His anger! Thank you for the terrific history lesson at the end of this Study! I printed it and plan to share it with my husband; his late father was a History teacher who often spoke about the fall of Jerusalem. You explained it much better than he did!
September 8, 2015
  • 1
Carolyn  Douglas
Carolyn Douglas LUKE 19...QUESTION 1 ZACCHAEUS was desperate to see Jesus and looked for a way to see Him by climbing a tree. He would not allow anything or anyone to stop him or get in his way. It says a lot about how much we want to be with the Lord either thru prayer or in spending alone time. Jesus rewarded ZACCHAEUS by saying that not only will I give you time but I am coming to your house. Jesus honored him in front of the whole town which was sure to be criticized as ZACCHAEUS was a chief sinner in the eyes of Jews for being a tax collector. ZACCHAEUS showed a contrite and repentant nature by paying restoration and reversing his sinful lifestyle. Yet Jesus responded to sincere and persistent need inside ZACCHAEUS. It's one of the many reasons I love Jesus dearly. Jesus shows equal and unbiased love to all. The one the world shuns is the very one Jesus seeks out! May we hunger for Jesus like ZACCHAEUS does. 
September 8, 2015
  • 1
Jeanne Majors
Jeanne Majors Zacchaeus was a bad person and Christ knew that he could reform him
September 8, 2015
  • 1
Carolyn  Douglas
Carolyn Douglas Luke 19 Question 2...The ruler was upset that there was absolutely no benefit for his investment with the servant. Fear had consumed his decision not to use it or follow the instructions that was left to him. We are all given gifts and talents and we are commanded to use them to be fruitful for the Lord's plans and purposes. Everyone feels fear but many of us let it paralyze us into non-activity. I also wonder if the desire was not strong enough to push past his fear. If we are passionate about our walk then even when fear grips us we are so committed to the Lord, that we push past. I believe that is why the ending of this parable was so harsh. We are either solidly committed and put forth work/effort or we are working for the other side. It merits solid reflection as we progress forward on our destiny and purpose.
September 8, 2015
  • 1
Julie Schneider
Julie Schneider Carolyn, your statement speaks to my heart and is exactly what i was pondering!  Thanks so much!
September 11, 2015
  • 1
Carol Pady
Carol Pady 1. He was chosen to show even a lowly tax collector can be forgiven.  2. He was upset because it was not used for profit.  3. Because they were calling Jesus a King who came in the name of the Lord 4. He was angry because the temple was being used for dishonest business practices. It was not set aside as a place of worship.  
September 9, 2015
  • 1
Cathy Webb
Cathy Webb I believe Jesus provided personal experiences that spotlighted situations that would occur through the ages to provide teaching and support for His followers in their time. Today it is easy for me to look around at others and compare their situations to my own. I can begin to feel very smug about my relationship with God – my Christianity. Jesus showed me how to be compassionate and accepting of those who outwardly (from my limited view) are not following God’s teachings or instructions. Jesus also demonstrated how God – the judge of each individual – forgives and accepts those with willing, repentant hearts. This story prompts me to be both accepting, discerning, and thankful for God’s immeasurable grace in whatever role I play in this scenario – and I may live out more than one …
September 10, 2015
  • 1
Carolyn  Douglas
Carolyn Douglas Luke 19 Question 3...The Pharisees were upset at how the people were responding to Jesus. He was the Word come to life and people were eager to be around this unassuming man. His deeds were unselfish, He performed miracles among them, and He took nothing from them. Jesus fulfilled the Word of God and the result was self evident. People were hungry to see and accept the teachings and wisdom that Jesus offered. The Pharisees were about the pride of position and used the Laws to weight and burden the people they were suppose to serve. God never intended for that to happen and Jesus was a living contradiction to that fact. The Pharisees seperated people from relationship to.Jesus. In the days ahead, Jesus would close that gap by His death and open the door to removing all barriers where we will forever be joined with Him by our acceptance of salvation.
September 10, 2015
  • 1
Lorna Smetak
Lorna Smetak To prove that all people can be saved, even the rich. He could made a profit of what he was given. The disciple were prasing the (King) Lord. The Pharisees didn't believe that he was Lord. It was suppose to be a place of prayer and the people were there to collect taxes that were living there.
September 10, 2015
  • 1
Marilyn DeJongh
Marilyn DeJongh Is there a way to print the lessons and study away from my computer?  I workd via computer from home and would like to do the lessons in another place. 
September 10, 2015
  • 1
Dion Todd
Dion Todd Click the small "Printable Version" link at the top left, right underneath the title of the message at the very top of the page.
September 11, 2015
  • 1
Shelby Casey
Shelby Casey Question One. I think that Jesus singled Zacchaeus out because Zacchaeus did not let his short stature and his low status in society or even the sin that he committed stop him for seeking Jesus. Zacchaeus did what he could (he climed the tree, came down when Jesus called him, repented and made amends and Jesus did the rest. Jesus  recognized Zacchaeus' heart, knew his potential and saved him. I don't believe we can save ourselves (works of the flesh) but I do think that God gives us the choice to answer his call and seek his face. When we do this inspite of our circumstances, we are blessed by Jesus presence. He comes to stay in our house so to speak (Big Smile).
September 10, 2015
  • 1
Margaret Ponchel
Margaret Ponchel Glory to God.  
September 11, 2015
  • 1
Cathy Webb
Cathy Webb Well said, Shelby! I'm smiling to know that Jesus is staying in my house!
September 12, 2015
  • 1
Carolyn  Douglas
Carolyn Douglas Luke 19 Question 4...Jesus and His love for His Father was evident as Jesus showed honor and submission in all things to the Fsther. By the actions of Jesus in this situation the intensity of actions was in direct response to turning a holy situation that was meant to draw others into worship of the Father into merchandising and monetary gain. Instead of approaching the Holy place of worship prayerfully the area was surrounded by the greed and avarice of people praying on those who came to worship. It is one of the most controversial passages because of the actions of Jesus. Understanding this means examining and digging into the passage to explore it's layers for the proper perspective and revelation.
September 11, 2015
  • 1
Margaret Ponchel
Margaret Ponchel Question 1: what was it about Zacchaeus that caused Jesus to single him about amongst all others? Hearing that Jesus was nearby and knowing the power of this man, Zacchaeus knew there was only one way to be able to see him. Being short of stature, he realized he'd have clear view if he climbed that tree. He put into action that which would enable him to gaze upon Jesus. His devotion to this end is what caused Jesus to single him out.
September 11, 2015
  • 1
Jacquelyn Riege
Jacquelyn Riege Zacchaeus was CHIEF of tax collectors That servant had proved himself unworthy to work for the nobleman........he had not made his money of any more value than when he received it.......plus he was afraid......one cannot work for the Lord and walk in fear.  Because they were being way to noisy and calling Jesus King etc and the Pharisees didn't like it Because they were using it for something other than what it is meant to be used for
September 11, 2015
  • 1
Lorna Smetak
Lorna Smetakedited: September 11, 2015 I was just listening to #2 in the book of Matthew. I do believe it has to do with spreading the word to others and turning to the gospel and the one did not didn't make it (you could say). In James 5:20 it says: " remember this: whoever turns a sinner from the error of their way will save them from death and cover multitude of sins.  
September 11, 2015
  • 1
Cathy Webb
Cathy Webbedited: September 12, 2015 2.  It’s difficult to answer the why question. As a teacher, I experience supreme frustration when a gifted, talented student indifferently does nothing to improve or increase the skills and abilities that are so obvious to me. I wonder now if these students are fearful of failure. I can’t imagine the depth of patience and pain God the Father has for each of us. To be so paralyzed by fear is the ultimate tragedy. 3.  At this triumphant high point Jesus followers were declaring boldly, loudly, and openly that Jesus was the KING of heaven sent from God. The religious leaders were so incensed at this, so blinded by their own arrogance and ignorance, that they wanted to silence the crowd. What an amazing God we serve that He could command stones to declare His kingship! I pray I stand up so openly for my King!
September 12, 2015
  • 1
Deng Tembreza
Deng Tembreza Q1. I feel like I am Zaccheus. A sinner with so much to be ashamed of but because I know in my heart that when I went back to the folds of HIS arms I was forgiven. I repented and seek the LORD GOD for he forgive my sins and now I am at peace and set free from sins as I praise and love GOD for his love and faithfullness through JESUS CHRIST OUR LORD
September 12, 2015
  • 0
<i>Deleted Member</i>
Deleted Member 1) I believe Jesus took Zacchaeus and told him to come down out of that tree, so He could go to his house for dinner. Jesus knew Zacchaeus was up in that tree and when he stopped to tell him to come down, I think Jesus for all those that were there to see that He loved everyone, sinner or saint, good or bad, they were all importan to Him, so He went into Zaccheaus's house to show others, that He had a love for everyone, no matter what they were or what they had been.
September 13, 2015- Edit- Delete
  • 0
<i>Deleted Member</i>
Deleted Member 2) I think the anger came from him, because he knew what the man could have done to make his money into more, like the other two, but I also believe for us today, Jesus has used this many times to make us realize, what He has given us, in talents, money, or whatever He has blessed us to be able to do, we are to use it, so we can help build the kingdom of Jesus. So that we may help sinners come to Him and give their lives and talents and abilities to Him. 
September 13, 2015- Edit- Delete
  • 1
Trish Hicks
Trish Hicksedited: September 14, 2015 1.As for why Jesus picked Zaccheaus. Baffles me a bit. But the only thing I can feel or sense I am being told that, Zaccheus showed Jesus just how important Jesus was to be able to see by Zacheaus that he went so far as to get up in a tree to see him.Everyone ellse was trying to chase ones that were pushing to see or touch Jesus. meanwhile Zacheaus the wprst of the worst tax collectors, goes to such lengths. Too it shows us as to the lengths Jesus  wants us to go to be with him,so that it doesn't matter what we have to put to the side, that we are to lean in and listen,look and see. Those are the ones Jesus wants to show that he choses to be with.
September 14, 2015
  • 1
Lissy Verghese
Lissy Verghese Thank you dear Pastor!
October 28, 2015